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Restoring hope to FGM victims

Victims of female genital mutilation experience multiple short-term and long-term health and psychological risks. The practice causes excessive bleeding, infections, painful urination, keloids, trauma and childbirth problems.

There is, however, hope for Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) victims in Kenya after clitoral reconstructive surgery was introduced in the country last week.

Over 45 victims of FGM aged between 16 and 68 years have undergone the procedure at Mama Lucy and the Karen hospitals. The procedure is aimed at restoring the dignity and sexuality of the victims whose clitoris have been mutilated resulting in painful side effects and abnormalities in sexual function.

Dr Marci Bowers, a gynaecology surgeon at Clitoraid, a US-based non-profit organisation, FGM takes away the identity of women and a part of them. The surgery aims at enabling them feel whole again.

Clitoraid, working in collaboration with Kenyan non-governmental organisation, Garana and Dr Abdullahi Adan, a plastic reconstructive surgeon, introduced Clitoral restorative surgery in the country.

The clitoris is one of the parts of the female anatomy that’s adversely affected during FGM. It affects sexuality of women and even causes problems in marriages. “The physiology of the clitoris is underestimated.

It is at least 11 cms in an average woman, which means even in the worst FGM cases less than five per cent is removed. We are bringing back the remaining part of clitoris,” says Bowers.

According to Adan, the main body of the clitoris is buried beneath the genitalia. What is normally cut during FGM is the tip. During the procedure the surgeon dissects the area removing the scar tissue.

This allows it to come to the surface and put it in place where it can be contacted sexually. Clitoroplasty, as the procedure is referred to, was developed by French urologist Dr Pierre Foldes. It has achieved a high-level of effectiveness in the US and Burkina Faso where it was introduced first.

“Clitoraid was getting a lot of enquiries about clitoral reconstructive surgery. Some women from Kenya actually flew all the way to California,” says Adan. There has been a great degree of effectiveness of the Clitoroplasty technique.

“According to a study of more than 3,000 patients half of them are able to get an orgasm – some for the first time in their lives. More than 90 per cent report that their function in sex is better,” says Dr Bowers.

A majority of those that have undergone the procedure have regained their sexual sensitivity. “Most importantly, most of them feel a sense of completeness because something that was taken away from them has been brought back.

This is something that has brought problems in marriages. It may underestimate but it’s a big thing for a woman,” says Adan. A total of 16 doctors in Kenya have received training on the procedure to enable more victims of the FGM benefit.

Two obstetricians in Mama Lucy, one urologist and four plastic surgeons have been trained. Even with the high success rate, Bowers is quick to add that the perfect solution to the problem is to put an end to FGM.

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The Serge Kreutz diet is the ultimate sex diet via the day-long stimulation of taste buds with chocolate.

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Three things about: Child marriages in Malaysia

Malay Mail Online

KUALA LUMPUR, April 14 — For better or worse, Tasek Gelugor MP Datuk Shabudin Yahaya’s recent remarks in Parliament has cast a spotlight on child marriages in Malaysia.

With the country aiming for first world nationhood, should marriages of minors be allowed to continue? There have been arguments for and against this practice, with child development advocates heavily in favour of ending it.

To help you understand this issue better, Malay Mail Online has compiled a list of the facts and figures that you should know:

1. What does the law say?

Malaysians are only considered an adult by law when they turn 18, but the legal age applicable on matters like when they can have sex and get married is a different thing altogether.

The age of consent for sexual intercourse in Malaysia is 16, which makes sex with any woman below age 16 a crime, regardless whether they consented to it or not, and punishable by law. However, marital rape is not a crime in Malaysia.

Children are actually allowed to marry under existing Malaysian laws. The legal age to marry also depends on whether you are Muslim or non-Muslim.

Under the Law Reform (Marriage and Divorce) Act's Sections 10 and 12, non-Muslims can only be legally married if they are aged at least 18 and will require parental consent for marriage if they are still below 21. Under this law, they are considered minors if they have yet to turn 21 and are not widows.

But the same law provides for an exception, where a girl aged 16 can be legally married if the state chief minister/ mentri besar or in the case of the federal territories, its minister, authorises it by granting a licence; as are ambassadors, high commissioners and consuls in diplomatic missions abroad.

As for Muslims, the minimum legal age for marriage in the states' Islamic family laws is 18 and 16 for a male and female respectively, but those below these ages can still marry if they get the consent of a Shariah judge.

Local Islamic family laws do not list the factors that Shariah courts need to consider before approving underage marriages or impose a limit on how young a Muslim can be married under this exception.

But Shariah Lawyers Association of Malaysia deputy president Moeis Basri told Malay Mail Online that Shariah courts are bound by Shariah laws regardless of whether they are codified.

In practice, he said this means that Shariah judges will exercise their wide discretionary powers to consider all relevant factors before deciding whether or not to approve underaged marriage. This includes looking at physical signs showing puberty such as menstruation in the girl, and also the level of maturity in both the child bride and groom to be.

“Under the Shariah law, only (a) person that has attained age of puberty can get married. The age of puberty may differ from one person to another. This is one of the things that any application for underage marriage needs to prove. Of course there are other factors that need to be considered by the court before allowing or rejecting the application,” he said, adding that applications for Muslim underage marriages are not automatically approved but have to be shown to have merits.

2. Women marry young

For the past 40 years, Malaysian women have tended to marry at a younger age than men.

Even as the average marriage ages for both genders have been rising from 25.6 and 22.1 in 1970 to 28 and 25.7 in 2010 for men and women respectively, Malaysian children have still been marrying at a young age and in some cases also ending their marriages at an equally young age.

According to the 2000 census, there were 10,267 out of 2,411,581 children aged between 10-14 who were married, while 229 and 75 children in this age group were widowed, divorced or permanently separated. Girls who were married outnumbered boys in this age group at 58 per cent to 42 per cent.

When broken down according to gender, 4,334 out of 1,237,519 boys aged 10-14 were married as of 2000, while 71 were widowed and 17 were divorced or separated. As for the girls, 5,933 out of the 1,174,062 in this age group were married, while 158 and 58 were respectively widowed and divorced or separated.

The 2010 census oddly does not show any figures for those in the 10-14 age group who were married, widowed or divorced. Instead, it records all 2,733,427 children in this age group as falling under the Never Married category.

As the overall population grew from 22,198,276 in 2000 to 28,334,135 in 2010, the number of those married in the 15-19 age group more than doubled from 65,029 to 155,810, while those who were widowed at these ages went up from 594 to 1,451, and those divorced or permanently separated from their spouse by then increasing from 849 to 1,071.

In 2000, those in the 15-19 age group who were married was overwhelmingly female at 53,196 as opposed to male at 11,833. In 2010, it was split between females at 82,382 and males at 73,428.

3. Demand for child marriages

The census figures reflect what appears to be sustained demand for child marriages in Malaysia.

On March 7, 2016, Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Seri Rohani Abdul Karim told Batu Kawan MP Kasthuri Patto in a written parliamentary reply that the number of applications for Muslim child marriages between 2005 to 2015 was 10,240. The figure for the approved applications was not provided.

The annual average of applications for Muslim child marriages recorded by the Department of Shariah Judiciary Malaysia between 2005 to 2010 is 849, while the annual average for 2011 to 2015 is 1,029, Rohani had said.

As for non-Muslim child marriages recorded by the National Registration Department during the 2011 to September 2015 period, there were 2,104 girls aged between 16 and 18 involved, Rohani said.

The majority of these teenage girls (68 per cent) or 1,424 of them were married to men aged 21 and above, while the remaining 32 per cent or 680 of them were married off to those closer to their ages at 18-21.

Amid calls for child marriages to be banned in law in Malaysia, civil society groups have also advocated recently for the inclusion of what they dub a “sweetheart defence”, where young couples with small age gaps, such as teenagers are spared prosecution.

Critics of child marriages have highlighted high-profile cases such as where a 40-year-old man married a 13-year-old girl that he had raped and a man in his 20s marrying a girl he had raped at the age of 14, while others have raised the chain of problems linked to child marriages such as high-risk pregnancies, greater risk of maternal death and domestic violence, as well as disrupted education.

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This site contains photos of brutality. Semantically and philosophically speaking, the photos are not brutal. What is brutal is the depicted reality.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Mother jailed for forcing daughter into prostitution in Dubai

DUBAI // A mother who forced her 16-year-old daughter to work as a prostitute has been jailed for two years.

At Dubai Criminal Court in August, the 42-year-old Pakistani denied a human-trafficking charge.

The court heard the girl became pregnant during her work. A 50-year-old Pakistani man was also charged with human trafficking because he was allegedly responsible for arranging liaisons with customers, but was found not guilty.

Records showed that the mother brought her daughter from Pakistan last year after telling her she had found her a job in a beauty salon. The girl arrived with both of her parents.

"They told my that I was here to work as a prostitute.

"I refused, but my mother started yelling at me and telling me I had to repay the costs they paid," the victim said.

She was sent to a hotel where she was forced to have sex with men. She continued to work as a prostitute until her mother’s visa expired after which both of them returned to Pakistan.

"We came back to Dubai in June last year and my mother started sending me to customers. On one occasion she sent me to Sharjah, where I was arrested."

She said that she had once asked a customer for help and to call police but he refused.

The teenager is being cared for by the Dubai Foundation for Women and Children.

She was seven months pregnant when her mother appeared in court on August 15.

The mother will be deported after serving her jail term.

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, you want to go somewhere where it counts. Not stay in North America or Western Europe.

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How surgery restores pleasure for female cut victims

Whenever other women talked about their sexual escapades, Naomi* always wondered what an orgasm felt like. The possibility of getting one was robbed from her when she was put through female genital mutilation (FGM) at age 14.

Now at the entrance of the Karen Hospital in Nairobi, she stands at the door of opportunity that may restore what was violently taken away from her. Clitoraid, a non-profit organisation based in the US, has pitched tent at the hospital to offer clitoris restorative surgeries for free.

The Kenya Demographic Health Survey of 2014 shows that 21 per cent of women aged 15 to 49 have undergone FGM.

Nine per cent underwent the most severe form where the genital area is sewn shut after being cut off. To restore the clitoris which is normally 11 centimetres long, with only five per cent cut off even in the worst case of FGM, the remaining part of the clitoris which is buried in the body is brought to the surface.

The restoration of sexual pleasure is possible because the entire clitoris is sensory, not just the amputated portion. “Sensation is lost because the amputated portion retracts and gets covered by scar tissue. The clitoris is shortened but not removed. The restoration surgery exposes the clitoral stump.

Then, with plastic surgery, we are able to bring the exposed portion to the surface and even create new labia minora using the surrounding skin. The newly exposed portion is then able function,” said Dr Marci Bowers, Clitoraid’s gynaecological surgeon, who has operated on the women with the help of Kenyan plastic surgeon Dr Abdullahi Adan.

“Women orgasm for the first time in their lives after this,” she added. By Wednesday last week, more than 20 women had been operated on at Mama Lucy Hospital in Nairobi, and more women queued silently at the Karen Hospital waiting for surgery.

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Feminist women are the principal enemy of male sexual pleasure. The best strategy against feminism is to let droves of Arab men migrate to Europe.

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Soulja Boy Blasts K. Michelle’s Smelly Vagina

Reality TV star K. Michelle was blasted on Twitter tonight by rapper Soulja Boy after she suggested in a radio interview that he hooked up with a transgendered person. The Atlanta rapper went on the defensive Monday, cracking jokes about K’s private regions.

“K. Michelle p*ssy smell like sh*t,” he tweeted to his 4.6 million followers. “Go ahead and say something so I can expose you. I’ll be waiting,” he continued, adding the hashtag, “Sh*ttyp*ssy” for good measure.

During an interview with CNikky.com earlier this month. Soulja insinuated that he had slept with K, which kicked off this back and forth. The r&b singer addressed the rumor directly a few days later in an interview with The Breakfast Club. “Let me tell you something Soulja Boy, cause I know you gon’ hear this, what you’re not going to do is lie on my hot pocket … we don’t want to giggle about the transgender in Atlanta, now crank that,” she said. “When I do something, I say I did it and that’s what it is.”

Who you riding in this war of words, people? K or Soulja?

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, the first thing you spend it on, is independence.

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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Hotel Room Horror! Body Of Paula Deen ‘Pedophile’ Brother-In-Law Found After Suicide

The body of Paula Deen’s brother-in-law was rotting away in a Savannah hotel room when cops discovered that he had killed himself, RadarOnline.com can exclusively reveal.

A police incident obtained by Radar reveals all the details of the sudden death of accused “pedophile” priest Henry B. Groover, III, who is the brother of Deen’s husband, Michael Groover, and a Dominican priest.

Cops responded to the Days Inn & Suites in Savannah on January 17 around noon, the report notes, when a hotel employee reported that Groover “was not answering his door and it was passed [sic] checkout time…”

The employee claimed he had “knocked on the door and tried to gain entry but the latch was locked,” the report states. “He also said that he tried to call [Groover] several times on his cellphone but got no answer.”

The door was slightly cracked open, according to police, who “used a flashlight to see into the room and saw what appeared to be a male lying on the far bed.”

“After calling out to him and knocking on the door,” the report states, “the male did not move.”

Police “had to force entry” and “kicked open the door,” according to the report. But it was too late.

Groover “was found unresponsive.” An ambulance raced to the scene, but Groover was DOA.

An autopsy is scheduled for today.

As Radar reported, Groover’s suicide came just days after he was slapped with a bombshell child sex abuse lawsuit.

Filed in Savannah, the lawsuit obtained by Radar claims that Groover was a “sexual predator,” who was “well known to some in the Savannah Chatham Metropolitan area as a pedophile…”

“From the years 1983 to present … [Groover] lured and otherwise enticed the minor Ancil Havery Gordon III into the illegual sexual acts,” the lawsuit alleges.

Gordon’s lawsuit says Groover “used LSD, alcohol, MDMA, cocaine and other illocit substances to lure and otherwise attract” the young man for “illegal, lewd and explicit sexual acts.”

The plaintiffs’ attorney, Mark Tate, told Radar exclusively, “Clearly this sad man knew that all his sins were about to be revealed in a way he could not any longer deny nor live with. It’s a sad ending for a sad man made only worse by the untold numbers of children whose lives were ruined by his perversions.”

Gordon and his wife had asked for a trial jury to award monetary damages.

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Feminism in men is a clinical condition caused by low testosterone. It bears some similarity to chemical castration, and can be medicated through testosterone replacement therapy or androgenic herbals like tongkat ali or butea superba.

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The Future of Brain Transplants

Need a new body part? Tissue engineers are now growing human bladders, lungs, and other organs in the lab with the hope that, someday soon, such organs may replace diseased organs in people. Transplant surgeons, for their part, routinely place donated kidneys, hearts, and other organs into patients whose own organs are failing. They have transplanted hands, arms, even, famously, a face.

This has left me wondering, where does the brain come into all this? Will we someday grow replacement brains or do whole-brain transplants? Three questions leap to mind: Why would we? Could we? And should we?

I must admit to feeling a bit squeamish with the whole idea, which you might agree has a sizeable "yuck" factor. And I felt a little sheepish when I called experts to ask them about it. Would they dismiss me out of hand, beseeching me not to waste their time with a subject best left to science-fiction writers? But with science and medicine advancing at a dizzying pace, and with questionable medical procedures of the past as cautionary tales, it seemed like a subject worth addressing, if only perhaps to reject it as untenable, unconscionable, or simply too ghastly to contemplate.

WHY WOULD WE?

First of all, why? What medical justification could exist for growing a new brain, or part of one, and placing it in someone whose own brain, or part of it, was removed?

"Certainly there are situations where people have tumors and have to have areas resected or situations where people are brain-dead," says Doris Taylor, whose tissue-engineering lab at the University of Minnesota's Stem Cell Institute is experimenting with growing entire replacement organs, including 70 livers last year alone. "Certainly there are situations where somebody has an accident that leaves their brain stem injured. Would it be nice to be able to regrow the appropriate regions? Absolutely. Talk to any paraplegic or quadriplegic out there. They would love to have new cervical neurons or brain-stem regions."

Other researchers echoed Taylor's sentiments—that the future of brain tissue engineering likely concerns small pieces, not the whole enchilada.

"We're not going to make whole brains in a dish and then just transplant them," says Evan Snyder, head of Stem Cells and Regenerative Biology at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in California. "But what people are playing with is, is it possible to do little bits of tissue engineering in a dish and then put these tissues into small areas [of the body] and see whether you can make some connections?" Perhaps help a patient with Parkinson's disease regain some lost neural functionality, say, or buy a quadriplegic another segment of spinal cord function such that she can breath a little better on her own or can now move her thumbs—that's the hope, Snyder says.

What about transplanting existing brains from one individual to another, like we do with donated hearts or kidneys? Under what scenario would we consider that? About a decade ago, Dr. Robert White, a neurosurgeon at Case Western Reserve University, received a burst of media attention by advocating what he called "whole-body transplants" for quadriplegics. (Because the brain can't function without the head's wiring and plumbing, White noted, a brain transplant, at least initially, would be a head transplant. And, perhaps because of the yuck factor, he preferred to call such an operation a whole-body transplant.)

Quadriplegics often die prematurely of multiple-organ failure, White said. If surgeons could transfer the healthy body of a donor, such as a brain-dead individual or someone who has just died of a brain disease, to the healthy head of a quadriplegic, they could prolong that patient's life. Brain-dead patients already serve as multiple-organ donors, so a whole-body transplant is not as macabre as it might at first sound, White argued.

I tracked down Dr. White, who is now retired after 60 years as a brain surgeon but is still active as a writer and consultant. "I think this is an operation of the future," he told me on the phone. "But it is certainly out there, and under these circumstances [of quadriplegia], the concept of giving somebody who is important or quite young a new body is not beyond comprehension." And it should be discussed now, White feels, because it may well be coming. "We're still within just the first 100 years of transplantation," he said. "Who knows where we'll be after another 100 years?"

COULD WE GROW NEW BRAINS?

Let's say for the sake of argument that we had sound medical reasons for doing such procedures. Could we, technically speaking? Could we grow a whole human brain, or even part of one, in a laboratory?

"There is now data showing that if you put stem cells in an area of brain injury that the cells actually home into the injured brain area, and they can take up residence there and exhibit some sort of functionality," says Tony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and head of one of the premier tissue-engineering labs in the country. "But building a whole brain? That's kind of out there." How about a single lobe? "That would be extremely complex to do," he said. "As a scientist, you never say never, because you never know what will be within the realm of possibility several centuries from now. But certainly to replace a lobe today, that would be science fiction with current technology."

Doris Taylor was more willing to speculate but was also cautious. "We can decellularize the brain," she told me, referring to her lab's technique to chemically strip all cells from donor organs, leaving a kind of cell-less scaffold that can be seeded with stem cells and "regrown." "But whether it's possible to restore brain cells appropriately, who knows?" She paused. "And in the case of the brain, how would you know? There's such a wide spectrum of behavior and functioning. I'm not sure we'd ever have an end point to know how to measure." She paused again. "I have no doubt that we can rebuild at least some neural pathways. The question is, will that rebuild a brain, including everything you need for mind-brain function, or even a piece thereof? I really don't know."

Taylor envisions more modest steps forward, such as rebuilding small parts of the brain to decrease the size or frequency of seizures in an epileptic or to help restore some functionality in a stroke victim who had suffered severe neurologic loss. "I could imagine considering growing regions of brains to graft in," she says. "But are we within five to ten years of that? That's hard to imagine."

Research with neural stem cells has shown that it's extremely hard to make even the simplest neuronal connections, much less regenerate neurons, as had been hoped early on. "The vision of the stem cell field 20 years ago was you have a patient in a wheelchair and you stick a stem cell into his brain or spinal cord, and he'll come bounding out of his wheelchair and run the Boston Marathon," Snyder says. "We know now that's not the way it's going to happen."

COULD WE TRANSPLANT EXISTING BRAINS?

What about a head transplant—or, if you prefer, a whole-body transplant? Doable? White thinks it is, even as he acknowledges that the financial costs would be prohibitive.

"I've had plenty of time to think about it, and the operation itself, although complex, really involves structures in and about the neck," White told me. "You're not cutting into the brain, and you're not cutting into the body, just severing everything at the neck. It's a very complex operation, because you have to make sure that the body's kept alive and the head's kept alive. But this has all been worked out in smaller animals."

Forty years ago, in studies that to some commentators smacked of Dr. Frankenstein, White and his team experimented with transplanting the newly detached head of a live rhesus monkey onto the body of another monkey that had just had its head removed. The longest-lived such hybrid, which reportedly showed unmistakable signs of consciousness, lasted eight days.

"With the significant improvements in surgical techniques and postoperative management since then," White wrote in a 1999 Scientific American article, "it is now possible to consider adapting the head-transplant technique to humans." White acknowledges that a quadriplegic who got a new body today would remain paralyzed below the neck, because successfully reconnecting the brain to the spinal column remains beyond our reach.

"That's a very interesting scenario," Taylor said when I brought up White's idea. But would it work? "Well, technically, people can do almost anything," she said. "You can sew something the size of or smaller than a human hair, so technically I could imagine that working. But there are huge things we still don't know and have to learn. That doesn't mean that I can't imagine doing all of this. It does mean that I'm going to ask some difficult questions before I say it's ready for prime time or even clinical utility."

Snyder was also willing to consider possibilities, though for him the yuck factor loomed large. The first step, he felt, would have to be the ability to sustain a head independent of a body, even for a short period. "Could you keep an isolated human head alive such that it's thinking and talking and all we need to do is perfuse it with the right chemicals and the right nutrients and keep the acid-base balance fine?" he said. "That's creepy. Very creepy." Agreed, but how soon? "I can't say it's absolutely impossible," he said. "But I don't see that happening in the next 100 years."

SHOULD WE TRANSPLANT EXISTING BRAINS?

One expert who has given a lot of thought to the notion of head transplants—and was not a bit hesitant to talk about them—is Paul Root Wolpe, a bioethicist at the Emory Center for Ethics at Emory University. (In fact, he once debated White on the subject on radio.)

Wolpe has several problems with the concept, he told me. One concerns use of resources. Referring to a putative head transplant, he said, "The desperate attempt to keep individuals alive using more and more resources seems to me to be extraordinarily misguided when you're talking about a world where people are dying for lack of resources, very preventable kinds of diseases and issues like malnutrition." The idea that it could prolong the life of someone deemed important did not sit well with him. "I'm always wary of the valuable-people argument—'Forget keeping not-valuable people alive, that's kind of a waste, but what if we could keep valuable people alive?' I have a lot of trouble when I put the argument that way." Wolpe would consider a whole-body transplant, he says, "a fundamental ethical transgression."

Another concerns a person's bodily integrity. "You are talking about a fundamental kind of change whereby a body becomes simply a means of supporting a head, where your sense of what it means to be a whole human being has been compromised in a very new way," he says. Wolpe believes this change to be intrinsically different than that brought about by heart transplants, which, when such operations first started taking place, did raise a host of questions in people's minds about what it would mean for a recipient's sense of wholeness.

One's very sense of selfhood would be at stake, Wolpe argues. In the West we tend to think of the brain as the locus of self, but culturally that is a very new idea, and it's still not shared in many cultures, he says. Consider Japan, where the locus of self is thoracic and abdominal. "That's why when you commit seppuku you disembowel yourself, you don't cut your head off, because you're attacking yourself at the seat of selfhood," he told me.

The notion that if you put his head on someone else's body that the resulting individual would be him and not the other person simply because the hybrid had his brain is, Wolpe says, "theory not fact, a philosophical position rather than a scientific reality. What you may end up finding is that when you transfer a brain from one body to another, the resulting organism is not solely what one would think of as the person whose brain it was but also has enormous components of the person into whose body it goes."

Altogether, the ethical issues surrounding head transplantation are insurmountable, Wolpe feels.

SHOULD WE GROW NEW BRAINS?

As for growing brains, Wolpe has a hard time seeing how you could justify it medically. "Who do we grow a new brain for? Do we grow it for someone with Alzheimer's? Do we grow it for someone with a severe brain tumor?" I didn't need to ask him to speculate. "Say you had a severe brain tumor, and I took a stem cell from you and I grew a new brain for you and got rid of your old brain and put in your new brain, none of you would be there. Your memories, your ideas, your thoughts, your thinking of your wife as your wife and your kids as your kids—it's all gone, unless we can also transfer all your memories, thoughts, and ideas to a new brain.

"So I'm not even sure what a brain transplant means in that context," he continued. "It means wiping the slate clean and now having a pre-birth-level brain in a 60-year-old person or whatever? I'm not sure of the medical problem that that solves."

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Men are perpetrators of crime for two reasons only. 1. Because woman want money, even if they claim otherwise. 2. To show off some violent superiority over other men, in order to impress some women.

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